Portrait and Event Photography-London Canada

Latest Images

Satellite of Love

Satellite of Love

2016/07/08

 

FERN

FERN

 

Sifton Bog Environmentally Significant Area (ESA) is located on the south side of Oxford Street, west of Hyde Park Road. The map on the reverse shows the access points and trails.

NEW Images-Portrait-Event-Pet, Engagement,Family, Children, Bar Mitzvahs, Parties, Stag and Doe
Photography available NOW-Call for consultation-

Green FROG

Green FROG

– work on a sliding Scale- (What you can afford is what will be charged) E Transfers, or cash.
Please call 905 865 40234

Rendue Park

Rendue Park

Pinecroft

Pinecroft

Common Crackle

Common Crackle

Last weekend a dear friend, and all around good soul and I began a journey, starting at Pinecroft -The green Tea room and the Ponds surrounding.

Pinecroft-Erie-Drive

Pinecroft-Erie-Drive

Tiger Lilly

Tiger Lilly

Rose breasted-Grosbeak

Rose breasted-Grosbeak

Thank you Mother Nature

Drip-Drop

Drip-Drop

 

Photos and Imagery By Doug Worrall

reflecting

reflecting

of DW Photography

London Canada

Oil Painting

Oil Painting

Call for Event, Portrait-Pet-landscape-and Images for those in the Real estate Market

PHONE:

905 865 4034–London Canada

Morning glory Bud

Have a Wonderful Weekend

Please call to reserve a Consultation and photo shoot

Sincerely

Doug Worrall

of

DW Photography

Summer 2016 Imagery-Nature EXPOSED

2016-06-13

Summer 2016 Imagery-Nature EXPOSED

Expanse

Expanse

The word “nature” comes from the Latin word, “natura,” meaning birth or character. In English its first recorded use (in the sense of the entirety of the phenomena of the world) was in 1266 A.D.. “Natura”, and the personification of Mother Nature, was widely popular in the Middle Ages. As a concept, seated between the properly divine and the human, it can be traced to Ancient Greece though Earth (or “Eorthe” in the Old English period) may have been personified as a goddess. The Norse also had a goddess called Jord(or Earth).

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Algonquian legend says that “beneath the clouds lives the Earth-Mother from whom is derived the Water of Life, who at her bosom feeds plants, animals and human” (Larousse 428). She is also known as Nakomis, the Grandmother.

Cob-looking-proud

Cob-looking-proud

Cardinal

Cardinal

In Inca mythology, Mama Pacha or Pachamama is a fertility goddess who presides over planting and harvesting. Pachamama is usually translated as “Mother Earth” but a more literal translation would be “Mother Universe” (in Aymara and Quechua mama = mother / pacha = world, space-time or the universe). Pachamama and her husband, Inti, are the most benevolent deities and are worshiped in parts of the Andean mountain ranges (stretching from present day Ecuador to Chile and Argentina).

Admiral Butterfly

Admiral Butterfly

Abandoned

Abandoned

The Enlightenment

Pinecroft

Pinecroft

Enlightenment beliefs rooted themselves in reason and logic. The leaders of the Enlightenment believed that the knowledge must be widely known and must be pondered. Nature was analogous to God, however, and could not be examined. The believers and leaders of the Enlightenment had to separate nature from God. This led to the feminization of nature, the creation of the word: Mother Nature. Boyle suggested that examination of man is an examination of God. Therefore, nature had to be converted to woman, “a great…pregnant automation” to be examined. Bacon suggests that a man must inquisite truth through penetrating into these holes and corners, a sexual metaphor that feminizes nature. When nature was feminized and degraded, Carolyn Merchant suggests that it made possible for people to exploit and study it. Hence, the words “mother nature” come into play. These scientists utilized

to create a feminized nature —mother nature— so that it could be studied and exploited.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Wild flowers

Wild flowers

DW Photography

905 865 4034

93 Georgia Road

London, On. Canada

Photographer : Doug Worrall

The Red Winged Blackbird

2016-03-8

The red-winged blackbird

The red-winged blackbird is a passerine bird of the family Icteridae found in most of North and much of Central America.
Scientific name: Agelaius phoeniceus
Higher Classification : Agelaius
Red winged blackbird

Red winged blackbird

Breeds in marshes, brushy swamps, hayfields; forages also in cultivated land and along edges of water. Breeds most commonly in freshwater marsh, but also in wooded or brushy swamps, rank weedy fields, hayfields, upper edges of salt marsh. Often forages in other open habitats, such as fields and mudflats; outside the breeding season, flocks gather in farm fields, pastures, feedlots.

Redwinged blackbird

Redwinged blackbird

Among our most familiar birds, Red-wings seem to sing their nasal songs in every marsh and wet field from coast to coast. They are notably bold, and several will often attack a larger bird, such as a hawk or crow, that flies over their nesting area. The red shoulder patches of the male, hidden under body feathers much of the time, are brilliantly displayed when he is singing. Outside the nesting season, Red-wings sometimes roost in huge concentrations.

 

Red Winged blackbirds

Red Winged blackbirds

To defend his territory and attract a mate, male perches on high stalk with feathers fluffed out and tail partly spread, lifts leading edge of wing so that red shoulder patches are prominent, and sings. Also sings in slow, fluttering flight. One male often has more than one mate. Adults are very aggressive in nesting territory, attacking larger birds that approach, and loudly protesting human intruders. Nest: Placed in marsh growth such as cattails or bulrushes, in bushes or saplings close to water, or in dense grass in fields. Nest (built by female) is bulky open cup, lashed to standing vegetation, made of grass, reeds, leaves, rootlets, lined with fine grass.

 

Red Winged blackbirds

Red Winged blackbirds

 

Information :Wikipedia

Audubon

Photographer DOUG WORRALL

A FEW NEW IMAGES DUE TO CHANGE 2015

A FEW NEW IMAGES

We are Corm, We are CormorantsM343

22/09/15

After deep regret of loss of many animals into extinction in The Great Lakes area, have been forced to change to a new technique.Due to the lack of Pollution laws in ontario, the lack of

“Yogis” Parks officials and the lawless attitude of the Human CONDITION, in Ontario Canada–Hamilton seems to be the worse of the worse

, albeit all change, well, Most change is good, or at least good for you, I must learn daily therefore I enjoy, and grasp change.I adhore

Sunrise

Sunrise

change that is forced upon Mother Nature by Greed of the Human animal, I am happy to say, sure I draw electricity, and use the Health system, and electronics, other than

Springtime Canada

Springtime Canada

that would prefer to be off the GRID and not having to see the lack of Empathy, Emotional intelligence,Common sense, and just plain, good manners. People take advantage of there so called

friends, (which I find despicable, disgusting and NOT HUMAN) whatever is happening to Human,s  I blame each individual—-Themselves, I am a good person, and love myself, Sure there are

Pier Hamilton

Pier Hamilton

many who love themselves, but walk right by a man crawling on the ground asking for spare change so he can bend his mind around why the world is the way it is, Why are Humans so cruel, I

Red Winged black bird

Red Winged black bird

understand  homeless people, can so easily see my self homeless, Just to get away from dealing with Money grabbers, thieves, and corrupt Government officials, corrupt police and the sick

Green Heron

Green Heron

Television CULTURE. I am not going to touch People that Hold onto there GODS as a form of self preservation, believe whats best for you, Myself I beleive in My God, My god loves people, not

Green Heron

Green Heron

makes Judgments, My God is always there for me, and all he askes is me to share of myself, help those who need the help, Therefore I don’t skip the downtown area, I grasp those people and let

Green Heron

Green Heron

them know they are loved, Yes I give Homeless, food, Money whatever they, ask,If they are honest and say they are saving to get drunk, I will try to help them with words, but wont help them

Cuteness overload

Cuteness overload

escape, will help them to deal whats around them, but they are usually young strong bodied boys, and will suggest they find another way they are still young, you see they have 100,s of dollars in

Cootes Paradise

Cootes Paradise

tattoos, but are still bumming money, or they have Doc Martin Bova boots, costing well over 200$,

 

JUST MT THOUGHTS

 

ENJOY THE IMAGES

 

DOUG WORRALL

PHOTOGRAPHER

Visitors from the North

 

Migrating Birds-Spring Is Here

April 19 2014

Merganser

Merganser

Another year and the annual Spring Migration is on its way in Hamilton.

 

I have been out on my ebike this year and have noticed an increase in Mergansers and Grebs.

Greb horned

Greb horned

 

Ways To Help Spring’s Migrating Birds

duck party

duck party

 

Despite persistent late-occurring snowstorms, average temperatures are starting to climb, soon to be followed by the most deadly period of the year for birds: springtime. Although spring means new life and hope to many people, billions of birds face the tribulations of a perilous migration followed shortly by breeding and the production of scores of newbornbirds that will spend several highly vulnerable weeks as they grow and fledge.

duck party

duck party

 

According to Dr. George Fenwick, president of American Bird Conservancy, “Spring is a deadly time for birds for three big reasons. Scientists estimate that 300 million to one billion birds die each year from collisions with buildings, many during arduous migrations in unfamiliar environments. Up to 50 million die from encounters with communication towers and up to six million may die each day from attacks by cats left outdoors. These deaths occur year-round, but many occur during spring and fall migration.”

Ducks

Ducks

 

Some studies suggest that perhaps as many as half of all migrating birds do not make it back home,” he said, “succumbing to various threats on either end of the journey.”

First image of Robin

First image of Robin

 

One in five Americans engage in bird watching, so after months of waiting for migrants to return, many people turn to emails, phone lines, and social media to ask ABC a dozen variations on the same question: “How can I help the birds?” Here is our answer to that question, just in time for spring.

Male female

Male female

1. Keep your cat indoors

2. Prevent birds from hitting your windows

3. Eliminate pesticides from your yard

Merganser

Merganser

4. Buy organic food and drink Smithsonian-certified Bird Friendly Coffee

5. Create backyard habitat using native plants

Merganser

Merganser

6. Reduce your carbon footprint

Mates

Mates

Doug Worrall Photographer

 

Enjoy the images-thank you for doing your part to keep our wildlife happy

 

 

Doug Worrall

 

 

 

 

 

Wetlands – Cootes Paradise Marsh- Hamilton

History of Cootes Paradise Marsh

September 3, 2013

Blue Heron in flight

Blue Heron in flight

Prior to the 20th century, the nutrient-rich, shallow waters of Cootes Paradise thrived as a coastal freshwater marsh habitat. Almost 100 percent of Cootes Paradise was covered with emergent aquatic plants like wild rice and submergent plants like wild celery, providing food, shelter and migration stop-overs for a variety of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and insects. The lush wetland also provided ideal spawning, nursery and adult habitat for many fish like bass, perch, pike, herring and trout. This lead to its protection, first as a fish sanctuary in the 1870’s, and then as a wildlife preserve in 1927, and finally through the formation of the Royal Botanical Gardens in the 1930’s.

Green Heron

Green Heron

The plentiful flora and fauna of Great Lakes coastal freshwater marshes did not go unnoticed by settlers in the 1800s. Cootes Paradise and its surrounding natural habitats offered abundant fishing and hunting opportunities, fertile farmland and convenient access to water. However, human settlement of Hamilton Harbour and its surrounding natural lands brought with it several Stressor’s  that, over time, had a cumulative impact on the natural abundance of Cootes Paradise and neighboring lower Grindstone Creek marshes. Throughout Cootes Paradise’s watersheds, agricultural practices and residential, commercial and industrial development contaminated connecting creeks with sewage effluent, eroded soil and sediment and chemical runoff and destabilized flow patterns. In 1852 the Desjardins Canal, a shipping channel dissecting the marsh was recut through the centre of Burlington Heights directly connecting the marsh to the lake water levels, and disconnecting it from the Grindstone Creek marshes. In 1957 the lake water level became regulated with the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway further disrupting natural water cycles in the marsh.

Blue Heron in Flight

Blue Heron in Flight

Black Crowned Night Heron

Black Crowned Night Heron

Introduced European and Asian species thrived in this altered environment. Among the first non native species (1870’s) the common carp was purposely introduced as a replacement for the disappearing salmon. The feeding and spawning behaviors of non-native carp uprooted and destroyed marsh plants and re-suspended sediment muddying the waters. By the end of the 19th century, in addition to the rapidly rising carp population, exotic plant species like purple loose-strife and reed manna grass, also purposely introduced to North America, began successfully out-competing and eradicating, native plants in the wet meadow areas.

Green Heron and Dinner

Green Heron and Dinner

fishing technique

fishing technique

As human pressures on the watersheds increased, the decline in the health and biodiversity of Cootes Paradise became markedly visible. By the 1930s Cootes Paradise experienced a 15% permanent reduction in marsh vegetation, and by 1985 the level of plant loss reached 85% of its original coverage. This permanent loss of aquatic flora had a direct negative impact on water quality and the fish and wildlife inhabitants and economies of Lake Ontario. Since its dramatic decline began the Garden’s has been focused on restoring Cootes Paradise, with carp removal first attempted in the 1950’s.

Waiting in splendour

Waiting in splendour

Concerns over environmental degradation led the International Joint Commission to designate Hamilton Harbour as one of 42 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes. In 1986, the Hamilton Harbour Remedial Action Plan was initiated to address this environmental degradation in the Harbour and key remaining areas like Cootes Paradise and lower Grindstone Creek. Under this plan, a variety of new conservation projects and monitoring programs have been implemented by a variety of stakeholders to control pollution, restore and improve fish and wildlife habitat and communicate the health status of the wetlands.

My Favorite area for wildlife

My Favorite area for wildlife

For the last four years, I have been Biking the Harbourfront trail, Hiking into Cootes Paradise and learning more each day.As you notice, the Wildlife seem’s to be getting better in our wetlands.

Blue Heron Tongue

Blue Heron Tongue

Heron Gathering Heat

Heron Gathering Heat

Enjoy The Images

Doug Worrall Photographer

The Hendrie Valley Hamilton

Hamilton Canada offers a birder a great opportunity 

10/09/13

I am a firm believer “the early bird gets the worm”, in the case of Hendrie Valley-Hamilton-Canada , “The early Bird gets the Seed”The birds are waiting for you, and will land on your hand.

We had a Downey Woodpecker almost fly into my  chest he was so eager.

Enjoy the images and information

Doug Worrall

Good morning

Good morning

Located on Plains Road, this thriving wetlands ecosystem is part of the Royal Botanical Gardens parklands. Free to explore, the beautiful sunny wooded trails circulate through marshes, on boardwalks and across small bridges. You’ll see chipmunks, geese, turtles and tons of birds – bring feed if you want to see them
eat out of your hand. You’ll also see just as many photographers and birders! It takes about 60-90 minutes to leisurely explore. Paid parking is in the lot across from the RBG entrance. Once there, look for the large trailhead sign that says “Cherry Hill Gate”

Natural

Natural

Nuthatch

Nuthatch

An area that a friend has taken me two times now and, each time we discover different trails to explore. is the Hendrie Valley Trails of the Royal Botanical Gardens.The Trails are rich with diversity,plenty of wildlife, and a pleasant quiet ,short hike.

Bee eye reflect

Bee eye reflect

Wildflowers

Wildflowers

A smaller scale version of Cootes Paradise, this area which includes the 100 hectare Grindstone Creek Valley stretches to the end of Carroll’s Bay and contains the finest collection of floodplain wetlands on western Lake Ontario. Transferred to the Royal Botanical Gardens in 1941 for ecological protection, the area features slopes forested with old growth trees, a 60 hectare river mouth marsh complex, and 4 creeks. Major access points are along Plains Road and include the RBG Centre and Cherry Hill Gate.

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

Cardinal

Cardinal

This is a great spot to see birds and assorted waterfowl. You will see in this area that a large project is underway to create new banks along the water’s edge and also provide a system that works as a natural barrier against invasive carp. This has been facilitated through the re-use of over 100,000 discarded Christmas trees.And other equally intelligent moves to keep the marsh as pristine as possible.

Downey Woodpecker

Downey Woodpecker

Osprey

Osprey

Following the trail through the Grindstone Creek Delta, you soon arrive at a spectacular boardwalk that borders Grindstone Creek providing an excellent vantage point to watch nesting birds and observe beavers and other wildlife. This is a great place to bird watch and if you bring some seed along you can have some fun feeding the friendly birds by hand.

female Cardinal

female Cardinal

Wild Orchid

Wild Orchid

Sources:Wikipedia-Burlington Tourist,Cam Goede

Doug Worrall Photographer