The Red Winged Blackbird

2016-03-8

The red-winged blackbird

The red-winged blackbird is a passerine bird of the family Icteridae found in most of North and much of Central America.
Scientific name: Agelaius phoeniceus
Higher Classification : Agelaius
Red winged blackbird

Red winged blackbird

Breeds in marshes, brushy swamps, hayfields; forages also in cultivated land and along edges of water. Breeds most commonly in freshwater marsh, but also in wooded or brushy swamps, rank weedy fields, hayfields, upper edges of salt marsh. Often forages in other open habitats, such as fields and mudflats; outside the breeding season, flocks gather in farm fields, pastures, feedlots.

Redwinged blackbird

Redwinged blackbird

Among our most familiar birds, Red-wings seem to sing their nasal songs in every marsh and wet field from coast to coast. They are notably bold, and several will often attack a larger bird, such as a hawk or crow, that flies over their nesting area. The red shoulder patches of the male, hidden under body feathers much of the time, are brilliantly displayed when he is singing. Outside the nesting season, Red-wings sometimes roost in huge concentrations.

 

Red Winged blackbirds

Red Winged blackbirds

To defend his territory and attract a mate, male perches on high stalk with feathers fluffed out and tail partly spread, lifts leading edge of wing so that red shoulder patches are prominent, and sings. Also sings in slow, fluttering flight. One male often has more than one mate. Adults are very aggressive in nesting territory, attacking larger birds that approach, and loudly protesting human intruders. Nest: Placed in marsh growth such as cattails or bulrushes, in bushes or saplings close to water, or in dense grass in fields. Nest (built by female) is bulky open cup, lashed to standing vegetation, made of grass, reeds, leaves, rootlets, lined with fine grass.

 

Red Winged blackbirds

Red Winged blackbirds

 

Information :Wikipedia

Audubon

Photographer DOUG WORRALL

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The Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

A treat to find in your binocular viewfield, the Cedar Waxwing is a silky, shiny collection of brown, gray, and lemon-yellow, accented with a subdued crest, rakish black mask, and brilliant-red wax droplets on the wing feathers. In fall these birds gather by the hundreds to eat berries, filling the air with their high, thin, whistles. In summer you’re as likely to find them flitting about over rivers in pursuit of flying insects, where they show off dazzling aeronautics for a forest bird.

A treat to find in your binocular viewfield, the Cedar Waxwing is a silky, shiny collection of brown, gray, and lemon-yellow, accented with a subdued crest, rakish black mask, and brilliant-red wax droplets on the wing feathers. In fall these birds gather by the hundreds to eat berries, filling the air with their high, thin, whistles. In summer you’re as likely to find them flitting about over rivers in pursuit of flying insects, where they show off dazzling aeronautics for a forest bird.

  • The name “waxwing” comes from the waxy red secretions found on the tips of the secondaries of some birds. The exact function of these tips is not known, but they may help attract mates.
  • Cedar Waxwings with orange instead of yellow tail tips began appearing in the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada in the 1960s. The orange color is the result of a red pigment picked up from the berries of an introduced species of honeysuckle. If a waxwing eats enough of the berries while it is growing a tail feather, the tip of the feather will be orange.
  • The Cedar Waxwing is one of the few North American birds that specializes in eating fruit. It can survive on fruit alone for several months. Brown-headed Cowbirds that are raised in Cedar Waxwing nests typically don’t survive, in part because the cowbird chicks can’t develop on such a high-fruit diet.
  • Many birds that eat a lot of fruit separate out the seeds and regurgitate them, but the Cedar Waxwing lets them pass right through. Scientists have used this trait to estimate how fast waxwings can digest fruits.
  • Because they eat so much fruit, Cedar Waxwings occasionally become intoxicated or even die when they run across overripe berries that have started to ferment and produce alcohol.
  • Cedar waxwing

    Cedar waxwing

    Cedar waxwing

    Cedar waxwing

    Cedar Waxwing 2

     

    Cedar Waxwings feed mainly on fruits year-round. In summer, they feed on fruits such as serviceberry, strawberry, mulberry, dogwood, and raspberries. The birds’ name derives from their appetite for cedar berries in winter; they also eat mistletoe, madrone, juniper, mountain ash, honeysuckle, crabapple, hawthorn, and Russian olive fruits. In summer Cedar Waxwings supplement their fruit diet with protein-rich insects including mayflies, dragonflies, and stoneflies, often caught on the wing. They also pick items such as scale insects, spruce budworm, and leaf beetles directly from vegetation.

  • The cedar waxwing is a member of the family Bombycillidae or waxwing family of passerine birds. It is a medium-sized, mostly brown, gray, and yellow bird named for its wax-like wing tips. Wikipedia
    Scientific name: Bombycilla cedrorum
  • Photographer DOUG WORRALL
  • Information Wikipedia
  • The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

A FEW NEW IMAGES DUE TO CHANGE 2015

A FEW NEW IMAGES

We are Corm, We are CormorantsM343

22/09/15

After deep regret of loss of many animals into extinction in The Great Lakes area, have been forced to change to a new technique.Due to the lack of Pollution laws in ontario, the lack of

“Yogis” Parks officials and the lawless attitude of the Human CONDITION, in Ontario Canada–Hamilton seems to be the worse of the worse

, albeit all change, well, Most change is good, or at least good for you, I must learn daily therefore I enjoy, and grasp change.I adhore

Sunrise

Sunrise

change that is forced upon Mother Nature by Greed of the Human animal, I am happy to say, sure I draw electricity, and use the Health system, and electronics, other than

Springtime Canada

Springtime Canada

that would prefer to be off the GRID and not having to see the lack of Empathy, Emotional intelligence,Common sense, and just plain, good manners. People take advantage of there so called

friends, (which I find despicable, disgusting and NOT HUMAN) whatever is happening to Human,s  I blame each individual—-Themselves, I am a good person, and love myself, Sure there are

Pier Hamilton

Pier Hamilton

many who love themselves, but walk right by a man crawling on the ground asking for spare change so he can bend his mind around why the world is the way it is, Why are Humans so cruel, I

Red Winged black bird

Red Winged black bird

understand  homeless people, can so easily see my self homeless, Just to get away from dealing with Money grabbers, thieves, and corrupt Government officials, corrupt police and the sick

Green Heron

Green Heron

Television CULTURE. I am not going to touch People that Hold onto there GODS as a form of self preservation, believe whats best for you, Myself I beleive in My God, My god loves people, not

Green Heron

Green Heron

makes Judgments, My God is always there for me, and all he askes is me to share of myself, help those who need the help, Therefore I don’t skip the downtown area, I grasp those people and let

Green Heron

Green Heron

them know they are loved, Yes I give Homeless, food, Money whatever they, ask,If they are honest and say they are saving to get drunk, I will try to help them with words, but wont help them

Cuteness overload

Cuteness overload

escape, will help them to deal whats around them, but they are usually young strong bodied boys, and will suggest they find another way they are still young, you see they have 100,s of dollars in

Cootes Paradise

Cootes Paradise

tattoos, but are still bumming money, or they have Doc Martin Bova boots, costing well over 200$,

 

JUST MT THOUGHTS

 

ENJOY THE IMAGES

 

DOUG WORRALL

PHOTOGRAPHER

Visitors from the North

 

Migrating Birds-Spring Is Here

April 19 2014

Merganser

Merganser

Another year and the annual Spring Migration is on its way in Hamilton.

 

I have been out on my ebike this year and have noticed an increase in Mergansers and Grebs.

Greb horned

Greb horned

 

Ways To Help Spring’s Migrating Birds

duck party

duck party

 

Despite persistent late-occurring snowstorms, average temperatures are starting to climb, soon to be followed by the most deadly period of the year for birds: springtime. Although spring means new life and hope to many people, billions of birds face the tribulations of a perilous migration followed shortly by breeding and the production of scores of newbornbirds that will spend several highly vulnerable weeks as they grow and fledge.

duck party

duck party

 

According to Dr. George Fenwick, president of American Bird Conservancy, “Spring is a deadly time for birds for three big reasons. Scientists estimate that 300 million to one billion birds die each year from collisions with buildings, many during arduous migrations in unfamiliar environments. Up to 50 million die from encounters with communication towers and up to six million may die each day from attacks by cats left outdoors. These deaths occur year-round, but many occur during spring and fall migration.”

Ducks

Ducks

 

Some studies suggest that perhaps as many as half of all migrating birds do not make it back home,” he said, “succumbing to various threats on either end of the journey.”

First image of Robin

First image of Robin

 

One in five Americans engage in bird watching, so after months of waiting for migrants to return, many people turn to emails, phone lines, and social media to ask ABC a dozen variations on the same question: “How can I help the birds?” Here is our answer to that question, just in time for spring.

Male female

Male female

1. Keep your cat indoors

2. Prevent birds from hitting your windows

3. Eliminate pesticides from your yard

Merganser

Merganser

4. Buy organic food and drink Smithsonian-certified Bird Friendly Coffee

5. Create backyard habitat using native plants

Merganser

Merganser

6. Reduce your carbon footprint

Mates

Mates

Doug Worrall Photographer

 

Enjoy the images-thank you for doing your part to keep our wildlife happy

 

 

Doug Worrall

 

 

 

 

 

Yearly Nature Images Hamilton Trails

Nature Images And Hamilton area Trail Systems

January 2nd 2012

Sunrise 5:30 A.M. May 2011

A Happy New Year to all from DW Photography and readers images and our writers. Special thanks to Jacqueline, Lois and Steve

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the readers here at DW Photography.Each passing year brings many obsticles to the revitalization of our natural habitat

throughout the world, We are still destroying  what we should be preserving. More than any time on our calendar our best friend Mother Nature needs our help.

Pick your small piece of nature and keep it clean and healthy. Find garbage that other people have left behind. Take ownership “stewardship” of your environment more than ever this year.

Thanking you in advance

Doug Worrall

“Living in Hamilton has many perks with the proximity of Lake Ontario and Hamilton Harbour.  By foot,  Bike,  Bus or drive down to the Harbourfront Park,  Cootes Paradise,  Princess Point,  The Harbourfront Trail is very long with many attractions starting in Hamilton then Burlington and further.”

June 5AM 2011

Known for its heavy industrial waterfront, Hamilton will surprise new visitors.

Sunset Hamilton Harbour

The past decade has dramatically changed the waterfront bringing with it new recreational uses and restored natural and cultural features.

Dundurn Castle April 22 2011

The Hamilton Waterfront Trail (7.5km):

Harbourfront Trail

follows Hamilton Harbour from Princess Point (Cootes Paradise) through Bayfront Park, Pier 4 Park, the Discovery Centre and on to HMCS Haida. You’ll also find Williams Coffee Pub, a Waterfront Ice Cream stand and the Hamilton Harbour Queen Cruises nearby.

Kayaking Cootes Paradise

At Cootes Paradise there is an impressive staircase with a cycling trough leading to Dundurn Park and some amazing lookouts. From here you can connect to Burlington via York Street- extreme caution is needed when crossing the ramp from the 403.

Whitetail Deer

Like Flies on

Male American Goldfinch

The Hamilton Beach Recreation Trail:

Skyway Bridge

Lift bridge

 follows the Lake Ontario shoreline for about 8 km taking people from Burlington under the Lift Bridge to Confederation Park and into the former Stoney Creek. Interpretative panels describe the history of Hamilton’s waterfront and explain the restoration process. Please note there is a new way to cross the very busy Eastport Drive/Beach Blvd.-take the path that goes under the bridge rather than crossing the road.

Getting the shot

Webster Falls

Gosling shaking all about

Blue Heron Harbourfront Park June 15 2011

Dundas Conservation area

  • Confederation Park – Van Wagner’s Beach Rd. and Centennial Parkway
  • Van Wagner’s Beach beside Lakeland Community Centre – Van Wagner’s Beach Rd. East of Confederation Park
  • Beach Blvd south of lift bridge

Juvenile Black Crowned Night Heron

Night Heron

Signet and pen June 2011

Hamilton Waterfront Trail

Rainbow trout

Harbourfront Park

The Pride of baltimore leaves hamilton harbour

The Pride of baltimore

  • Dundurn Park-York Blvd.
  • Bayfront Park-Harbourfront Dr and Bay St.
  • Pier 4 Park – Leander Dr. and Guise St.
  • Pier 8 – Canada Marine Discover Centre
  • HMCS Haida at Catherine St.

Photographers

The Speed of Deer

Lois McNaught

Steve Loker

Jacqueline

Doug Worrall

HAVE A GREAT YEAR

Doug Worrall Photography